Monday, November 23, 2009

Last Wish

Unfortunately, I don't think Prozac is going to bring back Katie's sanity. I thought while the drug was getting situated in her system that I would start working on loading Katie in the van. Just ask her to jump in for a treat and jump out immediately each day. No big deal, right? Generally, she resists, but today she started crying like I had never heard and shaking violently... just from being asked to load.If God ever takes one of my hounds while he or she sleeps, please let it be Katie. I would be so relieved if she passed away peacefully in her sleep when it is time for her to go. I fret about her needing a vet. I don't want to have to decide whether to panic her if she were sick or injured.I have started researching mobile vets. There appears to be several in my area that can do blood work and euthanize at home. If any of you live near me and have any experience with a mobile vet in our area, please let me know.For now, Katie is mostly content doing her cavalettis, hopping over a couple of jumps in the backyard, and extracting Kongs of every morsel. Every so often she wakes up and yelps in pain. I have no idea why, but I hope it does not get worse. I am sure she could use some acupuncture and swimming, but its not going to happen.Where is my Katie? This is not my MACH UD greyhound.

15 comments:

KF-in-Georgia said...

Jen, I'm so sorry Katie's going through this. If you haven't already, ask your vet for a powerful sedative/painkiller--something you can have on hand to knock Katie way out if there's an emergency (a broken leg or the like) and you have to wait for a mobile vet to arrive. I've heard of owners of dogs with osteo getting something like this from their vets. It's something you wouldn't use if you thought her emergency could be treated; you'd use it only to make things less traumatic for her at the very end.

Never Say Never Greyhounds said...

That is a great idea, Kathy. Thanks.

gyeong said...

Sometimes it takes a few weeks for the meds to kick in. Hopefully, there is still a chance she will snap out of it. With so many greys facing the osteo issue, I love the idea of a powerful sedative/painkiller from the vet. Great idea, KF-in-Georgia.

Carrie said...

I hate to hear this about sweet Katie. Sounds like a major panic attack, almost like I would be if forced to go shopping on Black Friday, and I am not kidding. Don't give up on the meds just yet. I would think that it would take time to build up in her system as it does for adults. Or there may be some different type that can be used. I pray that when it is time for Katie that it is peaceful and no time in the near future. You and her deserve that.

IHateToast said...

the poor thing. fear is very sad. i know we have our phobias, but imagine if you had no language and understanding to help explain something. i hope it settles into her system, but otherwise, i like KF's idea.

Kathy said...

I'm so sorry Jen. I can only guess how hard it is for you to see her this way because I know how much you love Katie. Kathy's idea in case of emergencies if needed is an excellent one.

Zan said...

Jen, I'm so sorry you and Katie are having to go thru this. I can only imagine just how sad and frustrated you must be. Nothing worse than feeling powerless to help her overcome her fears.

Snobound said...

Jen, I understand your concern too well. We're going through a similar kind of thing with our old collie, Dream. She's 12 now and most collies only live to be 12 or 13 anyway. She's lost all bladder control and has now been relegated to her recliner in the 'dogs room'. Keeping her clean is a never ending task - and one she absolutely hates. She's developed an open sore on her knee from all the licking and wipes and baths. Her back end is getting weaker by the day, and most days she doesn't even recognize us anymore. Watching her stumble around the house/yard, bumping into things, walking around on wobbly legs, looking completely bewildered is so heartbreaking to us. We rescued her from a puppy mill 6 years ago and she's been the best house dog we've EVER had. We used to taker her out to the woods with us and let her free run through the trees. Most days I was sure she was going to crack into a tree and kill herself for the way she'd tear through the forest. Now getting her to even get off the chair to go out to the bathroom is a major chore, let alone asking her to run! The thought of having to have her put down is too much for me. I'm selfish. I love that dog like there's no tomorrow. My heart breaks every day I go downstairs and see her pitifully laying in her chair asleep. I pray every night that the Lord would just let her die in her sleep so she'd finally be at peace and I wouldn't have to make that terrible life-ending decision for her. Our dogs...they mean so much to us, don't they?

Marie said...

Wow that really sounds odd. The only thing I might try is mat work. Get her lay on a mat and completely relax on cue, then start transfering it closer to a vehicle eventually ending up in the vehicle. Of course it would take months of work to get the relaxed part in any context if ever. The problem is they you aren't sure what the cause is. Classical conditioning might work if it were simply a negative association issue, but it sounds more complicated than that. At least from what you have described. (Could it have been an inner ear issue making her car sick that wasn't noticeable to you?)

I hate that we can't communicate more directly with them for stuff like this. Good luck.

Marie said...

In re-reading, could it be painful for her to be either getting in OR getting out of the vehicle? Have you tried a ramp?

IHeartDogs said...

Hugs to you and Katie...I'm so sorry. *sending positive healing vibes*

Jemma the Chihuahua said...

I'm so sorry to hear this. I have no experience with this, but I do hope that the meds just have not kicked in yet and it will soon. Poor Katie, I can't even begin to imagine how scared she must be and how helpless you feel. *HUGS*

Amanda said...

If you have a vet you work with many will do home visits for established clients. I was a vet tech for 10 years and accompanied vets on home visits for animals that for one reason or another could not be transported. I also did several home euthanasias. Usually a strong sedative is given before by the vet or you. If your vet won't do home visits you could try contacting a vet that does small animals and horses, they are set up with mobile trucks for the horses.

Never Say Never Greyhounds said...

Gosh, you are all so sweet. Thank you for all of the kind thoughts. I do think there is a physical component to it. She is so noise sensitive that I do wonder if traveling in a vehicle is creating a painful sound or is there an inner ear problem causing some vertigo. I don't think she looks car sick (she looks more like a storm phobic during a terrible storm), but I am not certain.

Jen

Paul said...

I'm so sorry to hear Katie isn't doing any better. I like Kathy F's idea too of having a strong sedative. The ramp idea sounds good too. You think Toby might make a house call if needed? Lots of hugs and prayers.